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Location for Fuse Talks and Fuse 19 Conference

 

510 Mount Vernon HWY NE
Atlanta, GA
30328

Daily Schedule 

Wednesday

Fuse Talks

5:00 p.m. Dine and Connect

6:00 p.m. Welcome

6:15 p.m. A.J. Juliani

6:35 p.m. Alyssa Gallagher

6:55 p.m. Edward P. Clapp

7:15 p.m. Sylvia Martinez

7:35 p.m. Design Panel

8:15 p.m. Close and Connect

Thursday

Session and Design Tracks

8:00 a.m. Light Breakfast

8:40 a.m. Home Group (All)

9:00 a.m BREAK

9:10 a.m. Session Block A | Design Briefs A

12:10 p.m. Lunch

1:30 p.m. Session Block B | Design Briefs B

4:30 p.m. BREAK

4:40 p.m. Home Group (All)

5:00 p.m. End of Day

Friday

Session and Design Tracks

8:00 a.m. Light Breakfast

8:40 a.m. Home Group (All)

9:00 a.m BREAK

9:10 a.m. Session Block C | Design Briefs C

12:10 p.m. Lunch

1:30 p.m. Session Block D | Design Briefs D

4:30 p.m. BREAK

4:40 p.m. Home Group (All)

5:00 p.m. End of Day

Sessions Information

Fuse Sessions

Expand each session link below to take a look at all the Fuse19 programming.

Session Block A - Thursday 9:10 a.m - 12:10 p.m

Session Block A

Thursday 9:10 a.m – 12:10 p.m

A1. LAUNCH into Design Thinking: How to Bring Out the Maker in Every Subject

A.J. Juliani, Centennial School District and University of Pennsylvania Graduate School of Education

Creative work can be hard. It can be challenging. It can sometimes be overwhelming to try and plan and incorporate into the classroom. Yet, we know our students are going to have to be more creative than ever to successfully thrive in today’s world. This workshop shares how design thinking can provide a structure for creative teaching and learning, and how this process can empower our students to do remarkable work inside our schools right now. In this workshop, A.J. Juliani will tackle these five strategies that work to build a maker mindset and inspire innovative work:

1. Choice-based instruction

2. Design-based projects

3. Authentic audience

4. Competitive Challenges

5. Launching to the World

A2. Unlearning & RuleBreaking to Foster Change

Alyssa Gallagher, inProgress Consulting

When was the last time you questioned the rules or best practices in your field?  Most of the time, these rules are unspoken and unwritten, often they’re often learned on the job – from a mentor or from watching what others in your organization do. Best practices may not be the problem but often they are surrounded by lazy thinking that gets in the way of innovation. You may not need to break rules, but you may need to break with convention and question the stated best practices. In this session will explore the value of taking an inventory of rules, turning “yeah, buts” into “yes, ands” and using constraints to your creative advantage. We will work to spot activities that add no value and act with confidence to call them into question. Learn easy to use tools & strategies to help you evaluate and questions the “rules,” both written and unwritten, in your organization.

A3. Looking Closely, Exploring Complexity, and Finding Opportunity

Edward Clapp, Project Zero, Harvard Graduate School of Education

Educational initiatives that emphasize making, engineering, and tinkering are becoming increasingly popular in K-12 education. Makerspaces, fab labs, and design studios are bringing with them exciting new tools, technologies, and curricula. But what is truly worthwhile about maker-centered learning? What are the most salient benefits of these maker-centered experiences? How can these practices be applied across the content areas and within interdisciplinary settings? In this interactive Fuse workshop session, Project Zero researcher Edward Clapp will present a series of hands-on activities aimed at exploring these questions and considering how pedagogical practice and the development of thinking dispositions can support the core principles of maker-centered learning. Highlighting key aspects of the framework for maker-centered learning developed by the Agency by Design research team at Project Zero, participants will consider what it means to develop a sensitivity to the made dimensions of the world by looking closely, exploring complexity, and finding opportunity. In addition to gaining a familiarity with the Agency by Design framework for maker-centered learning and its associated educator resources, participants will also have an opportunity to make connections between these new concepts and their home teaching and learning environments.

A4. Code, Invent, and Learn

Sylvia Martinez, CMK Futures, Columbia University FabLearn

2019 promises great opportunities for physical computing and coding featuring remarkable new technologies. This workshop will introduce one of these new technologies through hard fun, creativity, and problem solving — where computing meets tinkering, design, and the best practices in education. The workshop will introduce you to the micro:bit microcontroller, paired with the easy to use block-based programming language MakeCode.

Physical computing is the intersection of the digital world, and creates opportunities to supercharge project-based learning across the curriculum. Not only is it unprecedented for as much computational power to be accessible to children and usable in a playful creative fashion, but the low cost of these materials democratize powerful learning opportunities. These technologies and related constructive materials create great opportunities to bring progressive education ideals to life in any school. They also provide a fertile context for learning coding, engineering, and physical computing projects that bridge the digital and physical worlds. We learn together as we invent together.

A5. Flashlab: An Introduction to Design Thinking Workshop

Trey Boden

MVIFI specializes in design thinking as a problem-definition-and-problem-solving framework. Our FlashLab process provides a facilitated opportunity for people to take a “full lap” in design thinking using the MVIFI Compass to understand the process in a fun and collaborative context. The FlashLab is hands-on and highly experiential. Time will also be spent sharing some of the design thinking stories from Mount Vernon and beyond.

A6. Improv with Improv

Clark Taylor

Step outside your comfort zone and into the improv zone. Improv is an important technique and mindset in design thinking and the maker community.  It’s benefits include but are not limited to: increasing confidence, public speaking skills, comfort in intra and interpersonal skills, refined brainstorm abilities, improved listening, observation, creative thinking and decision making skills. Come learn flexibility, adaptability, “yes, and…,” and other critical skills. All while having a blast!

A7. Designing and Making a Better World: Atlanta Edition

Jim Tiffin

“The best way to predict the future is to create it.” – Abraham Lincoln

The world is a malleable place. How will you shape it? – MakerEd and Design Thinking are a potent combination that can catalyze the development of learner agency. At Mount Vernon Presbyterian School and the Mount Vernon Institute for Innovation, we’ve been working for years to set conditions for our learners to be real-world problem solvers. More recently, we’ve layered in more Maker, Design and Engineering (MDE) efforts to increase the sophistication of our prototyping and problem solving. We want to share our methods and stories and learn from yours.

For this expedition, we will give participants a chance to witness the impact they can make for members of the Atlanta community. We’ll seek out authentic users to have at the center of our design thinking work, and then explore the pedagogy of tinkering through hands-on/minds-on fabrication. We are hoping to engage with a hospital community for our user group, and we plan to co-opt some more advanced Maker equipment, such as a Carvey, to create higher resolution prototypes that address the identified needs of authentic users. HMW create playful gear to brighten the days and experiences of those in the Atlanta community?

Session Block B - Thursday 1:30 p.m - 4:30 p.m

Session Block B

Thursday 1:30 p.m – 4:30 p.m

B1. Designing Moments that Matter

Alyssa Gallagher, inProgress Consulting

Think of all the moments you experience each day. Some are intentionally planned, but many “just happen.”  What if we were able to intentionally craft more moments that matter for those we lead? This session is devoted to experience design and how to create both big and small experiences with intention, designing with empathy. We will work with tools to uncover the unstated needs of the people you are designing for and templates to help you through the experience design process. Being an experienced architect is, like many other elements of leadership, simply a set of behaviors and mindsets that you can learn and practice. Whether you choose to use these strategies to redesign a meeting, craft a critical conversation or create a meaningful learning experience, the skills of an Experience Architect will shift how you approach planning any experience.

B2. Looking Closely, Exploring Complexity, and Finding Opportunity

Edward Clapp, Project Zero, Harvard Graduate School of Education

Educational initiatives that emphasize making, engineering, and tinkering are becoming increasingly popular in K-12 education. Makerspaces, fab labs, and design studios are bringing with them exciting new tools, technologies, and curricula. But what is truly worthwhile about maker-centered learning? What are the most salient benefits of these maker-centered experiences? How can these practices be applied across the content areas and within interdisciplinary settings? In this interactive Fuse workshop session, Project Zero researcher Edward Clapp will present a series of hands-on activities aimed at exploring these questions and considering how pedagogical practice and the development of thinking dispositions can support the core principles of maker-centered learning. Highlighting key aspects of the framework for maker-centered learning developed by the Agency by Design research team at Project Zero, participants will consider what it means to develop a sensitivity to the made dimensions of the world by looking closely, exploring complexity, and finding opportunity. In addition to gaining a familiarity with the Agency by Design framework for maker-centered learning and its associated educator resources, participants will also have an opportunity to make connections between these new concepts and their home teaching and learning environments.

B3. Code, Invent, and Learn

Sylvia Martinez, CMK Futures, Columbia University FabLearn

2019 promises great opportunities for physical computing and coding featuring remarkable new technologies. This workshop will introduce one of these new technologies through hard fun, creativity, and problem solving — where computing meets tinkering, design, and the best practices in education. The workshop will introduce you to the micro:bit microcontroller, paired with the easy to use block-based programming language MakeCode.

Physical computing is the intersection of the digital world, and creates opportunities to supercharge project-based learning across the curriculum. Not only is it unprecedented for as much computational power to be accessible to children and usable in a playful creative fashion, but the low cost of these materials democratize powerful learning opportunities. These technologies and related constructive materials create great opportunities to bring progressive education ideals to life in any school. They also provide a fertile context for learning coding, engineering, and physical computing projects that bridge the digital and physical worlds. We learn together as we invent together.


B4. How to Design Learner-Centered Environments

Brittany Griffin,  AltSchool

The future of education will require new school models, new approaches for teaching and learning, and innovative leaders who can create the conditions for meaningful change. In this interactive design session, you will dive into the essential components of learner-centered education. Through this process, you will engage in collaborative activities to empathize, ideate, and develop prototypes that will accelerate the shift to effective and empowering learning experiences for all students. Explore AltSchool’s learner-centric platform that educators use to deepen their teaching practice and help students to take ownership of their learning.

B5. Improv with Improv

Clark Taylor

Step outside your comfort zone and into the improv zone. Improv is an important technique and mindset in design thinking and the maker community.  It’s benefits include but are not limited to: increasing confidence, public speaking skills, comfort in intra and interpersonal skills, refined brainstorm abilities, improved listening, observation, creative thinking and decision making skills. Come learn flexibility, adaptability, “yes, and…,” and other critical skills. All while having a blast!

B6. Where will student curiosity take us?

Chris Andres

Let’s explore the real world!  Using observation skills, participants will discover their own curiosities and passions during carefully planned expeditions in a target rich environment. These discoveries will then be translated to possible individualized experiences in the classroom. How might we empower all learners to be seekers and explorers?

B7. Designing and Making a Better World: Atlanta Edition

Jim Tiffin

“The best way to predict the future is to create it.” – Abraham Lincoln

The world is a malleable place. How will you shape it? – MakerEd and Design Thinking are a potent combination that can catalyze the development of learner agency. At Mount Vernon Presbyterian School and the Mount Vernon Institute for Innovation, we’ve been working for years to set conditions for our learners to be real-world problem solvers. More recently, we’ve layered in more Maker, Design and Engineering (MDE) efforts to increase the sophistication of our prototyping and problem solving. We want to share our methods and stories and learn from yours.

For this expedition, we will give participants a chance to witness the impact they can make for members of the Atlanta community. We’ll seek out authentic users to have at the center of our design thinking work, and then explore the pedagogy of tinkering through hands-on/minds-on fabrication. We are hoping to engage with a hospital community for our user group, and we plan to co-opt some more advanced Maker equipment, such as a Carvey, to create higher resolution prototypes that address the identified needs of authentic users. HMW create playful gear to brighten the days and experiences of those in the Atlanta community?

B8. Innovation Styles

Crystal Fernando

In this workshop we will explore core mindsets and ways of working used by the world’s top innovators. We will share innovation methods and powerful questioning techniques that have proven to increase the scale of new ideas, accelerate creative problem-solving and help teams work faster together. We will wrap by identifying ways you can put new skills/tools to work immediately when you return home.

B9. MAKER DOJO 2.0

Leigh Northrup & Mush Hughes

With the rapid development of Makerspaces in schools, there are new skills for students to learn and new strategies with which teachers can teach. Join Leigh Northrup and Mush Hughes from Cannon School to explore emerging technology and dig into the latest topics and best practices surrounding Maker culture. This hands-on session will include exploring Cannon School’s automated badging & certification system and allow attendees to experience the certification process from the student perspective. Attendees will also discuss cultivating maker culture with the purpose of increasing autonomous learning and MAKING sure our spaces are an inclusive environment for a diverse student population. The session will include some entry-level experiences with Carvey, Easel, Glowforge, and more. We will conclude with a hands-on air rocket activity.

Session Block C - Friday 9:10 a.m - 12:10 p.m

Session C

Friday 9:10 a.m – 12:10 p.m

C1. A Journey Toward Exploratory & Experiential Learning

Amanda Kopischke, Incubate to Innovate

Understand the Zone of Predictability vs. the Zone of Possibility and how one can reframe learning experiences, utilize mindsets, and implement innovation design thinking to invite learners and leaders into exploratory and experiential learning.  Learn and embrace ideas for systemic and systematic implementation of exploratory and experiential learning within your school community or organizational culture.

Short Bio: Amanda Kopischke is the Founder and CEO of Incubate to Innovate, LLC, a company that equips and empowers educators and exploratory leaders to solve problems and create opportunities together through collaboration and innovation design thinking.

C2. How to Design Learner-Centered Environments

Brittany Griffin, AltSchool

The future of education will require new school models, new approaches for teaching and learning, and innovative leaders who can create the conditions for meaningful change. In this interactive design session, you will dive into the essential components of learner-centered education. Through this process, you will engage in collaborative activities to empathize, ideate, and develop prototypes that will accelerate the shift to effective and empowering learning experiences for all students. Explore AltSchool’s learner-centric platform that educators use to deepen their teaching practice and help students to take ownership of their learning.

C3.C3. INNOVATION LEADERSHIP STYLES

Crystal Fernando

In this workshop we will explore core mindsets and ways of working used by the world’s top innovators. We will share innovation methods and powerful questioning techniques that have proven to increase the scale of new ideas, accelerate creative problem-solving and help teams work faster together. We will wrap by identifying ways you can put new skills/ tools to work immediately when you return home.

C4. Flashlab: An Introduction to Design Thinking Workshop

Trey Boden

MVIFI specializes in design thinking as a problem-definition-and-problem-solving framework. Our FlashLab process provides a facilitated opportunity for people to take a “full lap” in design thinking using the MVIFI Compass to understand the process in a fun and collaborative context. The FlashLab is hands-on and highly experiential. Time will also be spent sharing some of the design thinking stories from Mount Vernon and beyond.

C5. Why Students Should Invent for Social Good

Connie Liu, Project Invent

In this session, participants will learn by doing: they will use design thinking, engineering, and entrepreneurship tools to build an impactful innovation. They will work on teams to design a novel solution to challenges with blindness after a Skype interview with Jimmy, a 30-year-old who is blind and has worked as a partner with many of our student invention teams. Participants will identify critical needs, brainstorm solutions, and build a prototype to showcase their idea. Attendees will leave with the language and tools to effectively advocate and launch invention opportunities in their school or space.

C6. Visible Thinking Routines

Nicole Martin

Visible Thinking Routines are more than just graphic organizers, they are ways for students to organize ideas, conversations, and understand their learning in a way that is visual and collaborative. Join visual thinking routine expert Nicole Martin as she discusses how she has seen visual thinking routines used at Harvard Project Zero, in the classroom, as a consultant with other schools, and even in admin team meetings!

C7. Sketching with Foamcore: Increasing Fidelity & Resolution with Materials

T.J. Edwards

This session will explore the process of increasing fidelity (how it works) and resolution (how it looks) through iteration and material choice. After a quick “field activity” to introduce some new techniques and materials, we will jump into a design provocation using deceptively simple materials like paper and foamcore to create highly crafted prototypes.

C8. Provocations: Designing Experiences to Nurture Innovation and Creativity

Jim Tiffin

One goal of maker-centered classrooms is to have students make purposeful and imaginative creations. A more important goal is to develop the maker mindsets that help them to continually do so on their own – to become innovative if you will. The burden of coming up with project ideas needn’t be the teacher’s, but can instead be the students’. The teacher’s responsibility becomes creating conditions in which children’s innate imagination and curiosity can lead to creative and innovative outcomes. But this isn’t as straightforward as one might think. In fact, it is actually quite challenging, especially when you consider the material and tool options available (or not available) in schools. The course will share pedagogical practices that have been developed and used by veteran #MakerEd educators in their own classrooms, which span PS-12 settings. Participants will leave the session equipped with a framework that can help guide them via a more intentional planning approach to designing maker experiences. But this isn’t a sit-and-get course. Participants will make their way through a number of experiences designed using this framework to give them playful opportunities to explore new possibilities. Come ready to build, both physically and mentally!

C9. Designing a Better World with VR/AR

Marie Graham

Creating impactful VR/AR content is an exciting and attainable goal, even without coding experience. Almost every industry is impacted by emerging technology, and we all have the opportunity now to focus this innovation towards designing a better world. Marie Graham, the Director of Virtual and Augmented Reality here at Mount Vernon Presbyterian School, a school steeped in design thinking, will share the genesis of a unique VR/AR lab in partnership with Dell/Alienware that asks students to create nongaming content with industry leaders. We are currently working and designing with Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta (CHOA) creating content for pediatric rehab patients; designing a lab and VR content for tribal children in Muvalia, a small village in India; and filming an immersive 360 video for patrons in a local history museum. Creation platforms and the newest technology will be explored and test driven because virtual reality is uniquely experiential, so come prepared to play, design, and harness this powerful technology.

Session Block D - Friday 1:30 p.m - 4:30 p.m

Session D

Friday 1:30 p.m – 4:30 p.m

D1. A Journey Toward Exploratory & Experiential Learning

Amanda Kopischke, Incubate to Innovate

Understand the Zone of Predictability vs. the Zone of Possibility and how one can reframe learning experiences, utilize mindsets, and implement innovation design thinking to invite learners and leaders into exploratory and experiential learning.  Learn and embrace ideas for systemic and systematic implementation of exploratory and experiential learning within your school community or organizational culture.

Short Bio: Amanda Kopischke is the Founder and CEO of Incubate to Innovate, LLC, a company that equips and empowers educators and exploratory leaders to solve problems and create opportunities together through collaboration and innovation design thinking.

D2. Why Students Should Invent for Social Good

Connie Liu, Project Invent

In this session, participants will learn by doing: they will use design thinking, engineering, and entrepreneurship tools to build an impactful innovation. They will work on teams to design a novel solution to challenges with blindness after a Skype interview with Jimmy, a 30-year-old who is blind and has worked as a partner with many of our student invention teams. Participants will identify critical needs, brainstorm solutions, and build a prototype to showcase their idea. Attendees will leave with the language and tools to effectively advocate and launch invention opportunities in their school or space.

D3. Discovering Your Purpose and Values to Design A Strong Workplace Culture

Lauren Sikes, DesignEd

Having a deep understanding of our own purpose and values allows us to engage in the workplace with new meaning. DesignEd inspires people in an organization to reach their fullest potential so that the culture of the organization transforms into a place where together people can do meaningful work and accomplish more than they ever thought possible. Participants will walk away with an understanding of their own personal values and how these values can be used to bring purpose and contribution to the workplace. Participants will also be able to replicate this exercise in their own workplace to increase collaboration and performance.

D4. Songs for Change

Matthew Neylon

The news is noisy, but music is beautiful. While I might turn off the news after hearing the same story 2 or 3 times, I can listen to a good song with a message hundreds of times. How might we leverage songwriting to teach design thinking, illuminate someone else’s narrative, or promote a social cause. Come learn the many ways learners can shift their perspective by interviewing others and using observational findings to draft lyrics to an original song. Then, find out the simple way that any student can create a beat in GarageBand and layer their song on top, no musical training required! Participants will write and record a song for social change or to bring awareness to a topic they discover relates to another user and also discover how this process could be extended to script writing/playwriting/storyboarding/and film scoring.

D5. Designing a Better World with VR/AR

Marie Graham

Creating impactful VR/AR content is an exciting and attainable goal, even without coding experience. Almost every industry is impacted by emerging technology, and we all have the opportunity now to focus this innovation towards designing a better world. Marie Graham, the director of virtual and augmented reality here at Mount Vernon Presbyterian School, a school steeped in design thinking, will share the genesis of a unique VR/AR lab in partnership with Dell/Alienware that asks students to create nongaming content with industry leaders. We are currently working and designing with Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta (CHOA) creating content for pediatric rehab patients; designing a lab and VR content for tribal children in Muvalia, a small village in India; and filming an immersive 360 video for patrons in a local history museum. Creation platforms and the newest technology will be explored and test driven because virtual reality is uniquely experiential, so come prepared to play, design, and harness this powerful technology.

D6. Provocations: Designing Experiences to Nurture Innovation and Creativity

Jim Tiffin

One goal of maker-centered classrooms is to have students make purposeful and imaginative creations. A more important goal is to develop the maker mindsets that help them to continually do so on their own – to become innovative if you will. The burden of coming up with project ideas needn’t be the teacher’s, but can instead be the students’. The teacher’s responsibility becomes creating conditions in which children’s innate imagination and curiosity can lead to creative and innovative outcomes. But this isn’t as straightforward as one might think. In fact, it is actually quite challenging, especially when you consider the material and tool options available (or not available) in schools. The course will share pedagogical practices that have been developed and used by veteran #MakerEd educators in their own classrooms, which span PS-12 settings. Participants will leave the session equipped with a framework that can help guide them via a more intentional planning approach to designing maker experiences. But this isn’t a sit-and-get course. Participants will make their way through a number of experiences designed using this framework to give them playful opportunities to explore new possibilities. Come ready to build, both physically and mentally!

FUSE FAQ

What Are The Different Parts To Fuse19?

Fuse Talks Speaker Event is on Wednesday night.
Fuse Sessions workshop track on Thursday and Friday.
The Design Brief track in also on Thursday and Friday

What to wear?

Comfortable clothing. In design thinking, we want folks to be active and focused, so dress for comfort and prototyping with glue guns! We tend to be more casual than “business casual,” and jeans are fine!

Where to park?

If you are driving to Mount Vernon’s campus, we are located at:

510 Mount Vernon HWY, NE
Atlanta, GA 30328

When you arrive on campus, you will drive by a baseball field on your right. There is a gravel lot nearby and plenty of striped parking spaces on the campus road, as well. We’ll have signs to help direct you. We do have a new Upper School building coming online, so do be aware of construction as you look for parking.

I’m at the Hyatt Place Atlanta/Perimeter Center, how do we get from the hotel to Mount Vernon if we’re not driving?

There will be a shuttle, or people can walk. It’s 1 mile.

Hotel address:
Hyatt Place Atlanta/Perimeter Center
1005 Crestline Parkway
Atlanta, Georgia, USA, 30328

Will Wi-Fi be available?

Yes.

Are laptops, tablets, etc. recommended? Allowed?

You are welcome to bring a laptop or tablet. We ask that you be “fully here” and not checking email, texts, etc. while working with your team. For certain Fuse Sessions workshops, a laptop may be very helpful, if not expected. If you are in the Design Briefs track, you do not necessarily “need” your laptop/tablet, but it can be a great tool for some of the work.

Are meals provided and what time each day do we start?

Wednesday night, June 5: Light dinner is provided.
Thursday, June 6: Light breakfast and lunch are provided.
Friday, June 7: Light breakfast and lunch are provided.

The light breakfast consists of muffins, yogurt, etc. There will be coffee, tea and other drinks.

Snacks are provided each day…design thinkers need lots of fuel for creative energy!

If you have food restrictions and/or allergies, please reply to this email and let us know so that we can accommodate your needs.

On Wednesday night, the evening programming begins at 5:00 p.m. for the light dinner and Fuse Talks.
For Thursday and Friday, plan on being at Mount Vernon at 8:00 a.m. for some food and fellowship. Programming begins at 8:40 a.m. each day and concludes at 5:00 pm.
Ready to register for FUSE '19?   Register now!
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